Saturday, September 19, 2020

FO: The Adventurer Hat

Happy Saturday, friends.

Here's the first version of my "Adventurer Hat," which will be KUAS Design's newest pattern release this fall.

What makes this an Adventurer hat, you ask? Well, it was designed with a super thick folded brim that is secured to the main body of the hat. I'm certain this will keep your ears snug and warm during the coldest of winters
 
Was your first thought that you dislike sewing? (I do.) Well, there's no sewing involved! The cast-on edge is knit together with the body of the hat. I have a special hack that makes this process easy. You can find this on my "Knitting Up A Storm, the blog" Facebook group. (If you haven't already joined, I welcome you to. Straightaway after releasing a pattern, I choose a person at random to win the newly published pattern for free. I also run exclusive promos and giveaways too.)
To give the brim a bit of a twist on the traditional 1x1 ribbing, I literally have the pattern work up a twisted rib. It's takes a few moments longer, but it looks so clean and tidy.

The hat will come in about three sizes, and will give you some choices: slouchy, fitted, traditional ribbing, no purled line at the edge of the brim, pom-pom, etc. 

Project Info

Size: M

US 6 - 4.0 mm
US 7 - 4.5 mm
 
198 yds/93 grams
natural Mix
 
Hobby Lobby Pom-Pom 

I am always one for simple textures.

Now on to knit another version in Madelinetosh's Daffodil colorway for fall!

Thursday, September 17, 2020

FO: Great Falls National Park Socks

 Good morning!

I've been on a hiking kick for a couple of years now, so I was excited to get my hands on a couple of skeins from KnitWit's National Parks yarn collection. I got a skein of her Bryce Canyon yarn, as well as the Great Falls yarn, which is featured today.

I casted on this puppy at a week-long family reunion in beautiful Geneva, IL. There's rolling farmland hills that is so picturesque. We had such a great time kayaking, shopping, horseback riding, hanging with family and just "being," without being connected to the internet. I got so much knitting done on two pairs of socks and Dockhouse Sweater.

There was a stray cat that lives at the cabin, and he made a lovely companion for knitting outside.
Wine and knitting while watching sunsets...
I did a toe-up version of vanilla socks with short row heels.
This was my first time horseback riding. My horse had a mind of his own and got me in trouble with the lady that was instructing us.
My knitting matched my scenery at times.

Now this photo below was taken at our former house. This was the last time I spent quality time knitting in that backyard last summer before the weather turned really cold in October.

Materials & Information
Project: Toe-Up Vanilla Socks with Short Row Heels
Judy's Cast on with 14 sts, 32 st short row heels, and Jeny's Stretchy Bind-Off.
Leg increases to 82 sts.

US 0 - 2.0 mm
US 1 - 2.25 mm
 
1 skein = 420.0 yards (384.0 meters), 113 grams
Great Falls National Park
And today: voila! Finished! My only criticism is that the pairs of socks do not match the color intensity. The first sock is much darker, and the second is a lot lighter until toward the top of the sock leg. It's not a big deal, but I'm one that prefers near identical socks.
What next? I'm about to cast off on a hat that I'm designing. :)

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

FO: Sack Boy Dolls

What's another quick project that I finished last year? Little Big Planet Sackboys for my boys!

I started first with the brown sackboy, which has the open mouth and tongue details similar to the cover of the game. I'll walk you through the process, but you can find my complete project notes here.

I started knitting the doll at the base of the neck. Once I was at the level of the eyes, it was time to start the mouth. I basically treated the mouth area like an afterthought heel. I evenly put the mouth stitches on the circular needle before cutting the stitches between. I knit the mouth in black, and then decreased the sides of the mouth exactly like the toe section of a top-down sock. To finish, I grafted the leftover stitches together. (I added the KAM snap buttons before deceasing for the head after knitting the head for a few more rows.)

After the sockboy's body was knit and connected, I knit the legs and arms, attaching the 20 mm doll joint screws through the middle of a stitch before decreasing and binding off the limbs. They were snapped into place before stuffing the body.
The neck section proved difficult to support properly against the weight of the brown sackboy head. I ended up adding a pen to serve as the spine bone. Then, I stuffed the sackboy as much as I could without him looking like it was time to start a weight watcher's diet.
 
I choose a small inexpensive zipper and cut it to size and then hand-sewed it to the open chest cavity. Even a sackboys needs a heart, so I cut a small one out to place inside his chest! It's not practical to have the zipper freely zip up and down with no barrier between it and stuffing, so I sewed underneath the zipper with some thread so it was no longer functional.
The finishing touches were adding faux sewing accents and hot-gluing a tongue inside the mouth. I attempted to sew the black mouth parts into the stuffing to give the open mouth less of a bloated look, but was a bit unsuccessful. Overall, I was unhappy with the water the face came out, which is why the next one I made had a closed mouth.

Project Notes
Sackboy by Alan Dart, heavily modified
 
Brown Sackboy Materials:
Needles: US 6 - 4.0 mm
1 skein = 210.0 yardsin in the color Brown for the body
A handful of yards of Yarn Bee Must Be Merino 7 Black
20 mm Doll joints, stuffing, zipper, red felt for tongue/heart & size 20 KAM snap buttons
 
Tan Sackboy Materials:
s: US 4 - 3.5 mm 
Yarn: Can't find the label. It was sport weight yarn that was really smooth from Hobby Lobby. I wrote down "Symphony Yarn," but can't seem to find that online.
20 mm Doll joints, stuffing, zipper, red felt for heart & Size 20 KAM snap buttons

I'm not crazy about how the mouth panned out, so sackboy #2 was a big improvement, in my opinion:

Even he has a heart!

Monday, August 24, 2020

FO: The Dockhouse Sweater

Guys, this raglan is one of my absolute favorite FO's ever. Period.

It is warm, squishy and has an appealing diamond texture in a captivating heathered green colorway. The V-shaped collar has faux buttonholes, and you can't go wrong with a long-sleeved raglan construction. Plus, let's talk about green clothing...you can sport it for so many occasions, espeically St. Patty's day, Halloween AND Christmas! 

(If I were Emeril Lagasse, I'd say "BAM!")

 
Materials & Notes
 
US 2 - 2.75 mm
US 3 - 3.25 mm
US 5 - 3.75 mm
 
US 5: 23 stitches and 34 rows = 4'' in the Diamond texture
 
Yarn
9 skeins = 1296.0 yards (1185.1 meters), 450 grams
4275 Pea Soup Mix, dye lot 701 
 
Notes:
Sport weight yarn, 216 sts

Total active days knitting it: 44
      Sleeves: 3-ish days each sleeve---plan on a week for a pair of sleeves
      Front or back sides, after armpit BO’s : 2-3 days each
      Bottom ribbing: 1-2 days
      Collar 1-2 days
      An average of 8-12 rds of 216 sts per day.

457g of yarn (1 lb 1oz) of yarn.


This was another project that I chipped away last August while at a family reunion near Galena, Il. Here's a little journey into my WIP stages:
That feeling, when you finally try it on and it fits perfectly!
 
I had to re-knit one of the sleeves due to an error on my part, so after I knit what was three sleeves, it was so satisfying throwing it in the wash.

Aw. The photo above was taken in what was my newly renovated bathroom at our last house, several months before moving. I miss those counters and mirrors...

As soon as it gets chilly this will be coming back on me!

FO: Rainbow Socks

Buon Giorno! Good Day!

As I began writing this next installment of "make-up posts," my kids finished their first day of e-learning at a new school district, and the quiet that once enveloped the house earlier could no longer be found, as they instantaneously became a bucket of energy. Yikes.

Anyhow...how are you? What have you been up to? Staying sane? Staying healthy?

I am continuing my journey of learning Italian. I started after the new year, then took a break around when we moved in the spring, then started learning more, then took a short break, and now it's about fall...it's time to get serious again! (I actually like being "the student.")

So, what's off the needle (as of a year ago?--eek): Rainbow Socks!

They are so pretty and cheerful. I specifically knit these during the warm months only. That means that I took two summers to knit each of the sock mates, and that was ok with me as I had other socks that I worked on too.

Materials & Notes
US 1 - 2.25 mm    US 1½ - 2.5 mm 
 
17.5 stitches and 23 rows = 2 inches 
 
1 skein = 465.0 yards (425.2 meters), 100 grams
9376 Over The Rainbow  dye lot #1604
 
Notes:
CO 72 sts onto 2.25mm/US1.
1x1 rib for 1.5'' 5 colors (T, G,Y,O,R), plus 2 rds of pink, then dec round in larger needle: (K16, k2tog)-2x, so 68 sts left.
Knit leg with larger needles until 7.5'' from CO edge.
I used Arne & Carlos' Short Row Heel Method. 34 sts heel. (Next time: work until 8 unworked center sts)
Knit insole 6'' (from heel edge), then decrease the toe sts until 12 sts left.

Since I've been slacking on "WIP" posts, let me take you through the entire journey:

These next photos were me taking this to two separate family reunion trips. The photo above was taken at a cabin surrounded by rolling farmland in Elizabeth, IL, near Galena, IL. The photo below was from a beach on Lake Michigan. 

Fun stuff! These reek of summer! The funny thing is that they are too warm to wear during the summer months, lol.

Stay tuned for me upcoming make-up posts. I've got three more FOs, and a bunch of WIPS.

Wednesday, July 08, 2020

FO: Forth of July Socks

Happy Independence Day, America!
What's more festive than holiday socks? 🙌 These socks are red, white and blue...plus have a stranded colorwork motif! Did I do any of that labor? Nope!

When Cascade came out with this Independence "Heritage Prints," I knew they had to be 4th of July socks! I called them "American Socks" on my project page, but they can be French socks too. :)

American Socks

Method: top-down, short-row heel

  Needles: US 0 and US 1
1 skein = 437.0 yards (399.6 meters), 100 grams
52 Independence

I hope this post finds you well.  <3

FO: Wild Rabbit

Knitting this wild rabbit was fun. Claire Garland has other realistic looking knit animals that I look forward to tackling soon, specifically the a deer/fawn and cat. 

I found these animal eyes at Hobby Lobby, which makes the rabbit look even more realistic.

Project Notes:
Wild Rabbit by Claire Garland


US 6 - 4.0 mm

1.8 skeins = 255.6 yards (233.7 meters), 90 grams
1.8 skeins = 486.0 yards (444.4 meters), 180 grams
0.48 skeins = 129.6 yards (118.5 meters), 48 grams
1 skein = 135.0 yards (123.4 meters), 85 grams
Colorway130 Rose
Yarn Bee Tender Touch
1 skein = 135.0 yards (123.4 meters), 85 grams
Dove 



It was really neat witnessing the clever construction of the animal while knitting it. Claire Garland really has created something special because she has an eye for detail.

I added whiskers using flexible beading wire. It wasn't in the instructions, but I felt like he/she needed some to look complete.