Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Eye-candy, pt2

After attending the Midwest fair (see post below), I decided to finish up my double-plied yarn that I start way back. I drafted the rest Saturday night, and spun all of Sunday. It took all of Sunday night through this morning to fully dry. But hey, there's no real curly-action going on, which is good. It's worth the wait.
I bought a really nice niddy-noddy at the fair, and figured out how to use it just in time to wrap the newly finished yarn around it. It's really not complicated to use. You keep it at a 90 degree angle on the top from the bottom, and begin by holding the yarn end in the middle. Then, you wrap top to bottom & top to bottom until all four corners were used on the niddy noddy. Once you complete the process, you tie it up the yarn ends, count how many strands (each revolution around the whole niddy-noddy is one yard for mine), take it off, wash/soak it, hang dry it with large weights (cans) until completely dry, twist it into a skein, and go about your merry little way.I think the colors blend very nicely. It gives off almost a calming feel to it. It was really fun watching the colors blend together, even on the singles. When I drafted the yarn, the colors kind of separated where it didn't get died completely through in the middle, and the colors would twist with the white, making a single-ply look like a double. Now that I double-plied the yarn, some of the colors look quadruple-plied. I'm guessing the roving was a fine merino. It really was a pleasure to work with, being soft and all. One advice I'd like to give is that yeah, you can pretty much hold the yarn however you want when you are single-plying the yarn...but when it comes to double-plying two singles together, watch out! Look up on the internet how to hold your hands for this! If you hold it like roving, then some parts would curl up and get spun all funky, and the yarn will not have a real shot at looking normal. Both single-plied yarn has to be kept seperated. Like Bettas. (That's right, I just mentioned fish.) "Gotta keep them seperated."
Weight: worsted
Fiber: fine Merino wool
Yards: approx. 100
Needle size: 7-9US
Started: June 3rd,2008-July 20th, 2008
I'm not quite sure what I would do with approx. 100 yards, but maybe these will become fingerless gloves one day. Who knows.
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